There Is A Big Difference Between Giving Up and Quitting

There Is A Big Difference Between Giving Up and Quitting

You can only bang your head on the garage door so many times before you realize that the door isn’t going to go up that way. Once you stop, regroup, and try again with another approach to the issue at hand, a change may open an entirely new outcome.

Parkinson’s doesn’t have to be all or nothing

Parkinson’s disease doesn’t have to be an all or nothing poker game. There is a happy medium where you can live well with Parkinson’s and enjoy your life. I have the utmost respect and appreciation for determination, grit, and longevity but if you are doing something and it isn’t working, don’t you owe it to yourself to try a different direction. As a writer and former inventor, I really do think that there is a time to “give up”, but that doesn’t mean to ever stop trying or finding new ways of fixing the problem. If you are on the wrong path and you don’t quit the path that you are on, how do you expect to find the right path? Clinging to the path that you are on is only going to delay your opportunity to find the one that might be just what you need.

Giving up doesn’t mean abandoning your path but maybe starting fresh or looking at the task with fresh eyes. Sometimes tenacity keeps us from trying options that if we were to try them, instead of remaining on the current path, might be of benefit.

Timing is crucial

Timing is crucial. If you have thoroughly exhausted a therapy or medicine and are in need of a new solution, then it might be time to be open to trying something fresh. There is a time to re-assess your exercise and to ask if a change is needed for a better option. The warm blanket of complacency can easily be too comfortable, so we choose to avoid a potential correction. I am definitely guilty of this oversight, at times.

Self-awareness and taking a hard look at oneself is not always an easy exercise, but with open eyes and a willingness to improve and grow, we really can improve our lives and the people in our lives.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The ParkinsonsDisease.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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